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COVID-By-The-Numbers Weekly Report

/COVID-By-The-Numbers Weekly Report
COVID-By-The-Numbers Weekly Report 2021-04-24T07:22:01-06:00

Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

April 21, 2021

Editors/News Directors: This is the final version of this release, which we’ve been sending out on Wednesdays since March 17 as schools were expanding in-person learning. Going forward, we will put out news releases only when there is significant change or when/if any school faces a mandatory return to remote instruction due to Rapid Responses. Individual districts that decide on voluntary temporary closures will be responsible for releasing that information to the public.

By the numbers: 51% of enrolled students back in class

817 public schools have been open two full weeks

SANTA FE – More than half of all students enrolled in New Mexico public schools were back in classrooms the week ending April 16, two weeks after all schools that could do so welcomed students back for in-person learning.

In that time, only one school has been required to return to remote instruction based on COVID-19 cases. Sixteen more schools voluntarily returned to remote instruction out of an abundance of caution over a few cases in a small school or because large numbers of students or staff had to quarantine as close contacts to a person who became infected off campus.

“As expected, New Mexico is now offering in-person instruction to every student who wants it in all but a handful of cases,” Public Education Secretary Ryan Stewart said. “New Mexico has 840 individual schools, and only 17 have had to return temporarily to remote instruction. I’d say that’s a good sign that our safety protocols are working as intended, and in-person learning can proceed with only minimal and temporary disruptions.

“The virus is still with us, and for our schools to remain open for in-person learning, all New Mexicans must remain vigilant about following COVID safe practices and obeying the Public Health Order regarding large indoor gatherings. COVID fatigue is real, but we have to stay the course a little longer,” Stewart said.

The following figures are based on data reported to the Public Education Department, with 81% of all districts and charter schools reporting, for the week ending April 16:

  • 160,500 out of 317,000 children (51%) were in classrooms last week, up from 149,000 (47%) a week earlier.
  • 34,400 out of 51,000 school staff (67%) were in buildings, down from 35,200 (69%) a week earlier.
  • About 73,800 students remained in remote learning by choice or due to a temporary setback at their school, down from 82,000 the week before.

REMOTE LEARNING

One district and five charter schools have remained in remote learning because tribal health orders in those areas prevented a large number of students from returning. They are:

  • Dulce Independent Schools
  • Walatowa Charter High School (Jemez Pueblo)
  • San Diego Riverside Charter School (Jemez Pueblo)
  • Native American Community Academy (Albuquerque)
  • Dził Ditł’ooí School of Empowerment, Action and Perseverance (DEAP) (Navajo Nation)
  • La Tierra Montessori (Ohkay Owingeh)

Additionally, these districts have chosen to return individual schools to remote learning temporarily:

AZTEC

  • Atec High, April 19-26
  • Park Avenue Elementary, April 14-19

BLOOMFIELD

  • Mesa Alta Junior High, April 14-25
  • Central Primary, April 14-25
  • Bloomfield High, April 15-29
  • Charlie Y. Brown High, April 15-29

CENTRAL CONSOLIDATED

  • Nizhoni Elementary, 10 days beginning April 9
  • Kirtland Elementary, 10 days beginning April 10
  • Kirtland Middle, April 14-27

FARMINGTON

  • Piedra Vista High, April 19-28

LAS CRUCES

  • Mayfield High School, April 16-22

LOGAN

  • Logan Elementary, April 16-May 3
  • Logan Middle, April 16-May 3
  • Logan High, April 16-May 3

SOCORRO

  • Socorro High, April 14-25
  • Cottonwood Valley Charter, April 16-30

VACCINATIONS

All of New Mexico’s nearly 51,000 K-12 educators and school staff have been offered the vaccine.

Until recently, the Department of Health vaccine registry did not distinguish between pre-K, K-12 and higher education so a precise count of K-12 educators who have been vaccinated is not available. However, about 86% of all pre-K through college educators in the registry have now received at least one shot, and 72% are fully vaccinated. Those numbers have increased steadily each week:

Week Ending 4/3Week Ending 4/10Week Ending 4/17
Educators in Registry65,00066,00066,100
Those with 1 shot54,65055,70056,800
Those with 2 shots40,00045,00047,700

Meanwhile, the state Department of Health on April 15 extended vaccine eligibility to all New Mexicans ages 16 and up, and the Public Education Department is urging eligible high school students to register for the vaccine at cvvaccine.nmhealth.org

SURVEILLANCE TESTING

Surveillance testing of unvaccinated, asymptomatic school staff will continue until all school staff are fully vaccinated. For the week ending April 17, 4,842 on-site school staff members (25%) participated in surveillance testing, up from (22%) the week before. The positivity rate for staff surveillance testing fell to 0.06% from .14% the week before. The state’s threshold is 5%.

The Public Education Department has asked every district and state charter school to develop and implement a voluntary student testing program no later than April 26, with a goal of testing 1% of the general student population weekly and 10% of student athletes. The proactive program is intended to further improve school and community safety by identifying and quickly responding to asymptomatic cases

RAPID RESPONSES

No additional schools were required to close the week ending April 17 because of Rapid Responses.

A Rapid Response is one or more positive cases at a school that were infectious while on campus. All cases that a school was notified of on a single day, along with all cases with test dates through the following day are grouped into a single rapid response. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

Eldorado High School in Albuquerque on April 13 became the first school required to return to remote instruction for 14 days after reaching New Mexico’s conservative threshold of four Rapid Responses in a 14-day period. In-person classes will resume April 27.

Only the individual school that reaches the four-in-14 threshold is required to return to remote learning. Other schools in the same district are not impacted.

WATCHLIST

In the week ending April 17, 33 school facilities appeared on the Environment Department’s Watchlist, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period. Those school buildings are:

ALAMOGORDO

  • Alamogordo High
  • Chaparral Middle

ALBUQUERQUE

  • Albuquerque Academy
  • Eldorado High
  • Manzano High
  • Menaul High
  • Menaul Intermediate
  • Mission Achievement and Success 2.0
  • Petroglyph Elementary
  • Tony Hillerman Middle
  • Valle Vista Elementary
  • Maintenance & Operations

AZTEC

  • Park Avenue Elementary

BLOOMFIELD

  • Bloomfield High

CARLSBAD

  • Carlsbad Early College High
  • Desert Willow Elementary

FARMINGTON

  • Country Club Elementary
  • Esperanza Elementary
  • Northeast Elementary
  • Piedra Vista High

HOBBS

  • Hobbs High

HOLLOMAN AFB

  • Holloman Middle

KIRTLAND

  • Kirtland Middle

LOS LUNAS

  • Sundance Elementary

RIO RANCHO

  • Cielo Azul Elementary
  • Lincoln Middle
  • Mountain View Middle
  • Rio Rancho High
  • Vista Grande Elementary

ROSWELL

  • Del Norte Elementary

SHIPROCK

  • Nizhoni Elementary

SOCORRO

  • Socorro High

TIJERAS

  • Roosevelt Middle

Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

April 14, 2021

By the numbers: New Mexico schools expand reopening

SANTA FE – More than 65,000 additional New Mexico children were back in the classroom in the week ending April 10, five days after all districts were expected to return to full reentry.

The Public Education Department announced March 8 that all schools were expected to move to full reentry no later than April 5 because, with protocols now in place to limit spread of the virus, it is now safe to provide students with improved educational opportunities and supports. Additionally, expanding surveillance testing to include student volunteers will help identify positive cases sooner.

Based on data reported to the Public Education Department, with 79 percent of all districts and charter schools reporting:

  • 149,000 out of 317,000 children (47%) were in classrooms last week, up from 83,600 (26%) a week earlier.
  • 35,200 out of 51,000 school staff (69%) were in buildings, up from 33,600 (66%) a week earlier.
  • About 82,000 students remained in remote learning, down from 107,000 the week before.

VACCINATIONS

All of New Mexico’s nearly 51,000 K-12 educators and school staff have been offered the vaccine.

Until recently, the Department of Health vaccine registry did not distinguish between pre-K, K-12 and higher education so a precise count of K-12 educators who have been vaccinated is not available. However, about 55,700 (84%) of the nearly 66,000 pre-K through college educators in the registry have received at least one shot, and more than 45,000 (68%) are fully vaccinated. Additionally, the districts and state charter schools reporting to the Public Education Department for the week ending April 10 indicated 14,354 staff members were fully vaccinated.

SURVEILLANCE TESTING

Surveillance testing of unvaccinated, asymptomatic school staff will continue until all school staff are fully vaccinated. For the week ending April 10, 4,432 on-site school staff members (21.9%) participated in surveillance testing. The positivity rate for staff surveillance testing increased to .14% from .08% the week before, still well under the state’s threshold of 5%.

The Public Education Department has asked every district and state charter school to develop and implement a voluntary student testing program no later than April 26, with a goal of testing 1% of the general student population weekly and 10% of student athletes. The proactive program is intended to further improve school and community safety by identifying and responding to asymptomatic cases.

RAPID RESPONSES

Eldorado High School in Albuquerque returned to remote instruction on Tuesday after reaching New Mexico’s conservative threshold of four Rapid Responses in a 14-day period. It was the first New Mexico public school to reach that threshold, which requires a 14-day return to remote instruction. In-person classes will resume April 27.

A Rapid Response is a series of interventions designed to prevent COVID-19 spread, beginning when the New Mexico Department of Health notifies a school that an employee or student has a confirmed positive case and was on campus/in the facility during the infectious period. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

Only the individual school that reaches the four-in-14 threshold is required to return to remote learning. Other schools in the same district are not impacted.

In the week ending April 9, 10 school facilities appeared on the Environment Department’s Watchlist, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period. Those school buildings are:

ALAMOGORDO

  • Alamogordo High
  • Chaparral Middle

ALBUQUERQUE

  • Cibola High
  • Eldorado High
  • Immanuel Lutheran School
  • Petroglyph Elementary

FARMINGTON

  • Country Club Elementary

RIO RANCHO

  • Vista Grande Elementary

SANTA FE

  • Santa Fe High

SHIPROCK

  • Nizhoni Elementary

Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

April 7, 2021

By the numbers: New Mexico schools expand reopening

44% of districts of ered full in-person learning last week

SANTA FE – The number of New Mexico children back in the classroom full time jumped 64% in the week ending April 3 as many returned from spring break and others moved to full reentry for the first time since school closings last spring.

Here is a breakdown based on data reported to the Public Education Department, with 77 percent of all districts and charter schools reporting:

  • 83,600 out of 317,000 children in classrooms (26%), up from 29,700 (9%) a week earlier, when many districts were on spring break.
  • 33,600 out of 51,000 school staff in buildings (66%), up from 14,000 (27%) a week earlier.
  • About 107,000 students remained in remote learning.

The Public Education Department announced March 8 that all schools are expected to move to full reentry no later than April 5 because it is now safe to do so with protocols in place to limit viral spread.

Of New Mexico’s 192 districts, non-charters and charter schools reporting to the Department of Health, 84 (about 44%) welcomed students into classrooms every school day in the week ending April 3. That is up from 45 districts (about 23%) the week before.

VACCINATIONS

All of New Mexico’s nearly 51,000 K-12 educators and school staff have been offered the vaccine as of today.

Until recently, the Department of Health vaccine registry did not distinguish between pre-K, K-12 and higher education so a precise count of K-12 educators who have been vaccinated is not available. However, about 54,650 (84%) of the nearly 65,000 pre-K through college educators in the registry have received at least one shot, and more than 40,000 (62%) are fully vaccinated.

Surveillance testing of unvaccinated, asymptomatic school staff will continue until all school staff are fully vaccinated. For the week ending April 2, 4,968 on-site school staff members (21.3%) participated in surveillance testing. That was a slight increase from the previous week, when 4,931 on-site staff members were tested. The positivity rate for staff surveillance testing dropped to .08%.

RAPID RESPONSES

To date, no New Mexico public school has been ordered to close for 14 days and return, where appropriate, to remote learning due to COVID-19 spread signified by four or more Rapid Responses in a 14-day period.

A Rapid Response is a series of interventions designed to prevent COVID-19 spread, beginning when the New Mexico Department of Health notifies a school that an employee or student has a confirmed positive case and was on campus/in the facility during the infectious period. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

Only the individual school that reaches the four-in-14 threshold is required to return to remote learning. Other schools in the same district are not impacted.

In the week ending March 26, 16 school facilities appeared on the Environment Department’s Watchlist, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period. Those school buildings are:

ALAMOGORDO

  • Alamogordo High
  • Chaparral Middle

ALBUQUERQUE

  • Cibola High
  • Eldorado High
  • Immanuel Lutheran School
  • Petroglyph Elementary
  • Volcano Vista

LAS CRUCES

  • Las Cruces High

RIO RANCHO

  • Cleveland High

SANTA FE

  • Atalaya Elementary
  • Santa Fe High

TIJERAS

  • Roosevelt Middle

Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

March 31, 2021

By the numbers: New Mexico schools expand reopening

28% of districts now of ering full in-person learning

SANTA FE – More than a quarter of New Mexico’s school districts were in full reentry the week beginning March 28, although the number of students and staff in the classroom declined dramatically due to spring break.

Of New Mexico’s 187 districts and charter schools, 52 (about 28 percent) are now welcoming students into classrooms every school day. As more districts and schools move to full reentry, the number in the hybrid learning mode is dropping, with 40 districts (21%) in hybrid this week, down from 113 (60%) a week ago.

Nineteen New Mexico school districts and charter schools serving about 66,000 students expanded in-person learning the week beginning March 28, with all 19 moving to full-reentry. They are:

  • Alamogordo
  • Artesia
  • Aztec
  • Carlsbad
  • Carrizozo
  • Clovis
  • Farmington
  • Hagerman
  • Hobbs
  • Lovington
  • Questa
  • Roswell
  • Santa Rosa
  • Tatum
  • Truth or Consequences
  • Altura Preparatory School (Albuquerque)
  • La Academia Dolores Huerta (Las Cruces)
  • Montessori Elementary & Middle School (Albuquerque)
  • South Valley Preparatory School (Albuquerque)

No districts or charter schools moved from remote to hybrid this week.

Altogether, 68% fewer students are in classrooms this week than last because many districts are on spring break. Here is a breakdown based on data reported to the Public Education Department:

  • 29,708 out of 317,000 children in classrooms (9%), down from 92,989 (29%) a week earlier;
  • 13,929 out of 51,000 school staff in buildings (27%), down from 30,360 (60%) a week earlier.

The Public Education Department announced March 8 that all schools are expected to move to full reentry no later than April 5 because it is now safe to do so with protocols in place to limit viral spread.

VACCINATIONS

All of New Mexico’s nearly 51,000 K-12 educators and school staff have been offered the vaccine as of today.

Until recently, the Department of Health vaccine registry did not distinguish between pre-K, K-12 and higher education so a precise count of K-12 educators who have been vaccinated is not available. However, about 53,000 (almost 84%) of the 63,000 pre-K through college educators in the registry have received at least one shot, and just over 30,000 (48%) are fully vaccinated.

RAPID RESPONSES

To date, no New Mexico public school has been ordered to close for 14 days and return, where appropriate, to remote learning due to COVID-19 spread signified by four or more Rapid Responses in a 14-day period.

A Rapid Response is a series of interventions designed to prevent COVID-19 spread, beginning when the New Mexico Department of Health notifies a school that an employee or student has a confirmed positive case and was on campus/in the facility during the infectious period. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

Only the individual school that reaches the four-in-14 threshold is required to return to remote learning. Other schools in the same district are not impacted.

In the week ending March 26, 16 school facilities appeared on the Environment Department’s Watchlist, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period. Those school buildings are:

ALBUQUERQUE

  • Albuquerque Academy
  • APS Student Transportation
  • Cibola High
  • Immanuel Lutheran School
  • Mission Achievement and Success 2.0
  • Valley High
  • Volcano Vista

ARTESIA

  • Artesia High

BELEN

  • Central Elementary

CLOUDCROFT

  • Cloudcroft Elementary

LAS CRUCES

  • Las Cruces High

RIO RANCHO

  • Cleveland High

SANTA FE

  • Atalaya Elementary
  • Santa Fe High

SILVER CITY

  • Silver High

SUNLAND PARK

  • Riverside Elementary

Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

March 24, 2021

By the numbers: New Mexico schools expand reopening

92,989 students now receiving in-person learning

SANTA FE – Thirteen New Mexico school districts and charter schools serving about 9,000 students expanded in-person learning the week beginning March 21, with 12 moving to full-reentry. They are:

MOVED TO FULL REENTRY:

  • Floyd
  • Fort Sumner
  • Melrose
  • Moriarty
  • Portales
  • Socorro
  • Springer
  • Texico
  • Wagon Mound
  • Cottonwood Valley Charter (Socorro)
  • Hozho Academy (Gallup)
  • SABE (Rio Rancho)

MOVED FROM REMOTE TO HYBRID:

  • McCurdy Charter School (Española)

Altogether, 9% more students are learning in-person this week than last based on data reported to the Public Education Department, with 72% of school sites reporting. Here is a breakdown:

  • 92,989 out of 317,000 children in classrooms (29%)
  • 30,360 out of 51,000 school staff in buildings (60%)
  • 26 of 187 districts/charter schools in full reentry (14%)
  • 113 of 187 districts/charter schools in hybrid (60%)

The Public Education Department announced March 8 that all schools are expected to move to full reentry no later than April 5 because it is now safe to do so with protocols in place to limit viral spread.

VACCINATIONS

All of New Mexico’s nearly 51,000 K-12 educators and school staff are being offered the vaccine between now and March 31.

Until recently, the Department of Health vaccine registry did not distinguish between pre-K, K-12 and higher education so a precise count of K-12 educators who have been vaccinated is not available. However, about 51,400 (almost 83%) of the 62,000 pre-K through college educators in the registry have received at least one shot, and almost 20,000 (32%) are fully vaccinated.

Surveillance testing of unvaccinated, asymptomatic school staff will continue until all school staff are fully vaccinated. For the week ending March 20, 6,790 on-site school staff members (22.4%) participated in surveillance testing. That is a decrease from 7,481 (31.6%) the week previous.

The positivity rate for staff surveillance testing increased slightly to .12% from .11% the week previous.

RAPID RESPONSES

To date, no New Mexico public school has been ordered to close for 14 days and return, where appropriate, to remote learning due to COVID-19 spread signified by four or more Rapid Responses in a 14-day period.

A Rapid Response is a series of interventions designed to prevent COVID-19 spread, beginning when the New Mexico Department of Health notifies a school that an employee or student has a confirmed positive case and was on campus/in the facility during the infectious period. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

Only the individual school that reaches the four-in-14 threshold is required to return to remote learning. Other schools in the same district are not impacted.

In the week ending March 19, 12 school facilities appeared on the Environment Department’s Watchlist, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period. Those school buildings are:

ALBUQUERQUE

  • Albuquerque Academy
  • St. Charles Borromeo School
  • Valley High
  • Ventana Ranch Elementary

BELEN

  • Central Elementary

CARLSBAD

  • Desert Willow Elementary

CLOUDCROFT

  • Cloudcroft Elementary

LAS CRUCES

  • Las Cruces High

SANTA FE

  • Atalaya Elementary

SILVER CITY

  • Silver High

SUNLAND PARK

  • Riverside Elementary

TAOS

  • Taos High

Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

March 17, 2021

By the numbers: New Mexico schools expand reopening

85,291 students now receiving in-person learning

SANTA FE – Fifteen New Mexico school districts and charter schools serving about 7,500 students expanded in-person learning the week beginning March 14, with 14 moving to full-reentry. They are:

MOVED TO FULL REENTRY:

  • Clayton
  • Cloudcroft
  • Dexter
  • Dora
  • Estancia (elementary only)
  • Estancia Valley Classical
  • Eunice
  • Jal
  • Logan
  • Maxwell
  • Moriarty (elementary only)
  • Mountainair
  • Tucumcari
  • Sandoval Academy Bilingual Academy

MOVED FROM REMOTE TO HYBRID:

  • Montessori Elementary and Middle School in Bernalillo

Altogether, 5 percent more students are learning in-person this week than last based on data reported to the Public Education Department, with 68% of school sites reporting. Here is a breakdown:

  • 85,000 out of 317,000 children in classrooms (26.9%)
  • 24,000 out of 51,000 school staff in buildings (46.5%)
  • 14 districts/charter schools in full reentry (7.5%)
  • 139 districts/charter schools in hybrid (74%)

The Public Education Department announced March 8 that all schools are expected to move to full reentry no later than April 5 because it is now safe to do so with protocols in place to limit viral spread.

VACCINATIONS

All of New Mexico’s nearly 51,000 K-12 educators and school staff are being offered the vaccine between now and March 31.

Until recently, the Department of Health vaccine registry did not distinguish between pre-K, K-12 and higher education so a precise count of K-12 educators who have been vaccinated is not available. However, about 46,000 (almost 77%) of the nearly 60,000 pre-K through college educators in the registry have received at least one shot, and 16,915 ( 28%) are fully vaccinated.

Surveillance testing of unvaccinated, asymptomatic school staff will continue until all school staff are fully vaccinated. For the week ending March 13, 7,481 on-site school staff members (31.6%) participated in surveillance testing. That is an increase from 7,355 (28.7%) the week previous.

The positivity rate for staff surveillance testing was stable at .1%.

RAPID RESPONSES

To date, no New Mexico public school has been ordered to close for 14 days and return, where appropriate, to remote learning due to COVID-19 spread signified by four or more Rapid Responses in a 14-day period.

A Rapid Response is a series of interventions designed to prevent COVID-19 spread, beginning when the New Mexico Department of Health notifies a school that an employee or student has a confirmed positive case and was on campus/in the facility during the infectious period. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

Only the individual school that reached the four-in-14 threshold are required to return to remote learning. Other schools in the same district are not impacted.

In the week ending March 12, 16 school facilities appeared on the Environment Department’s Watchlist, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period.

Those school buildings are:

ALAMOGORDO

  • Mountain View Middle

ALBUQUERQUE:

  • Albuquerque Academy
  • Public Academy for Performing Arts
  • Sandia Preparatory
  • St. Charles Borromeo School
  • Ventana Ranch Elementary

ARTESIA

  • Artesia Park Junior High
  • Yucca Elementary

CARLSBAD

  • Carlsbad High
  • Carlsbad Intermediate

CLOUDCROFT

  • Cloudcroft Elementary

FARMINGTON

  • Farmington High

MORIARTY

  • Moriarty Edgewood School Transportation

SANTA FE

  • St. Michaels High

SILVER CITY

  • La Plata Middle

TAOS

  • Taos High

Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

March 5, 2021

PED: 21 New Mexico public schools on COVID-19 Watchlist

SANTA FE – Twenty-one New Mexico school buildings appeared on the COVID-19 Watchlist in the week ending Friday, March 5, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period.

Those school buildings are:

ALAMOGORDO

  • Alamogordo High
  • Mountain View Middle

ALBUQUERQUE

  • Albuquerque Academy
  • APS Student Transportation
  • Hope Christian High School
  • Lavaland Elementary
  • Public Academy for Performing Arts
  • Sandia Preparatory

ARTESIA

  • Artesia Park Junior High
  • Yucca Elementary

CARLSBAD

  • Carlsbad High
  • Carlsbad Intermediate

CLOVIS

  • Clovis High

HOBBS

  • Mills Elementary

MORIARTY

  • Moriarty Edgewood School District
  • Moriarty Edgewood School Transportation

RIO RANCHO

  • Shining Stars Preschool
  • Vista Grande Elementary

RUIDOSO

  • Ruidoso High

SANTA FE

  • St. Michaels High

TAOS

  • Taos High

During that same period, no schools were placed on the Closure List.

The Watchlist, maintained by the New Mexico Environment Department, includes schools and businesses with two or more Rapid Responses within 14 days. Those with four or more Rapid Responses in 14 days are placed on the Closure List and required to close and, where appropriate, return instruction to remote-only learning.

A Rapid Response is a series of interventions designed to prevent COVID-19 spread, beginning when the New Mexico Department of Health notifies a school that an employee or student has a confirmed positive case and was on campus/in the facility during the infectious period. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

If a school has four rapid responses in a 14-day period, it must close and remain in remote-only learning mode for 14 days.

Only the individual school that reached the four-in-14 threshold would be required to return to remote learning. That means a school district could have one school closed for in-person learning, another on the Watchlist, and others with no impact.


Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

Feb. 26, 2021

PED: 24 New Mexico public schools on COVID-19 Watchlist

SANTA FE – Twenty-three New Mexico public school buildings appeared on the COVID-19 Watchlist in the week ending Friday, Feb. 26, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period.

Those school buildings are:

ALAMOGORDO

  • Alamogordo High
  • New Mexico School for the Blind

ALBUQUERQUE

  • Albuquerque High
  • APS Student Transportation
  • Hoover Middle
  • Hope Christian High School
  • Jimmy Carter Middle
  • Lavaland Elementary

ARTESIA

  • Grand Heights Early Childhood

CARLSBAD

  • Carlsbad High
  • Carlsbad Intermediate
  • Desert Willow Elementary

DEMING

  • Red Mountain Middle

HOBBS

  • Mills Elementary

JEMEZ PUEBLO

  • Jemez Valley Elementary

RIO RANCHO

  • Cleveland High
  • Ernest Stapleton Elementary
  • Maggie Cordova Elementary
  • Rio Rancho Elementary
  • Rio Rancho High
  • Sandia Vista Elementary
  • Shining Stars Preschool

RUIDOSO

  • Ruidoso High

SILVER CITY

  • La Plata Middle

During that same period, no schools were placed on the Closure List.

The Watchlist, maintained by the New Mexico Environment Department, includes schools and businesses with two or more Rapid Responses within 14 days. Those with four or more Rapid Responses in 14 days are placed on the Closure List and required to close and, where appropriate, return instruction to remote-only learning.

A Rapid Response is a series of interventions designed to prevent COVID-19 spread, beginning when the New Mexico Department of Health notifies a school that an employee or student has a confirmed positive case and was on campus/in the facility during the infectious period. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

If a school has four rapid responses in a 14-day period, it must close and remain in remote-only learning mode for 14 days.

Only the individual school that reached the four-in-14 threshold would be required to return to remote learning. That means a school district could have one school closed for in-person learning, another on the Watchlist, and others with no impact.


Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

Feb. 19, 2021

PED: 23 New Mexico public schools on COVID-19 Watchlist

SANTA FE – Twenty-three New Mexico public school buildings appeared on the COVID-19 Watchlist in the week ending Friday, Feb. 19, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period.

Those school buildings are:

ALAMOGORDO

  • Alamogordo High

ALBUQUERQUE

  • APS Student Transportation
  • Eldorado High
  • Jimmy Carter Middle
  • Lavaland Elementary
  • Manzano High
  • Sy Jackson Elementary

AZTEC

  • Aztec High

BLOOMFIELD

  • Naaba Ani Elementary

CARLSBAD

  • Desert Willow Elementary

DEMING

  • Red Mountain Middle

DEXTER

  • Dexter Elementary

HOBBS

  • Mills Elementary

LAS CRUCES

  • Mesilla Valley Christian

RIO RANCHO

  • Cleveland High
  • Ernest Stapleton Elementary
  • Maggie Cordova Elementary
  • Rio Rancho Elementary
  • Rio Rancho High
  • Sandia Vista Elementary
  • Shining Stars Preschool

ROSWELL

  • Goddard High
  • Parkview Early Literacy Center

During that same period, no schools were placed on the Closure List.

The Watchlist, maintained by the New Mexico Environment Department, includes schools and businesses with two or more Rapid Responses within 14 days. Those with four or more Rapid Responses in 14 days are placed on the Closure List and required to close and, where appropriate, return instruction to remote-only learning.

A Rapid Response is a series of interventions designed to prevent COVID-19 spread, beginning when the New Mexico Department of Health notifies a school that an employee or student has a confirmed positive case and was on campus/in the facility during the infectious period. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

If a school has four rapid responses in a 14-day period, it must close and remain in remote-only learning mode for 14 days.

Only the individual school that reached the four-in-14 threshold would be required to return to remote learning. That means a school district could have one school closed for in-person learning, another on the Watchlist, and others with no impact.


Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

Feb. 12, 2021

PED: 32 New Mexico public schools on COVID-19 Watchlist

SANTA FE – Thirty-two New Mexico public school buildings appeared on the COVID-19 Watchlist in the week ending Friday, Feb. 5, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period.

Those school buildings are:

ALAMOGORDO

  • Alamogordo High

ALBUQUERQUE

  • Cleveland Middle
  • Eldorado High
  • Manzano High
  • Mission Achievement and Success 2.0
  • Student Transportation
  • Susie Rayos Marmon Elementary
  • Sy Jackson Elementary
  • Volcano Vista High

ANTHONY

  • Gadsden High

ARTESIA

  • Artesia Public Schools Warehouse
  • Grand Heights Early Childhood

AZTEC

  • Aztec High

BELEN

  • Central Elementary

BLOOMFIELD

  • Bloomfield Early Childhood Center
  • Central Primary
  • Naaba Ani Elementary

DEMING

  • Red Mountain Middle

DEXTER

  • Dexter Elementary

FARMINGTON

  • McCormick Elementary

HOBBS

  • Hobbs High

LAS CRUCES

  • Las Cruces Public Schools
  • Mesilla Valley Christian

LOVINGTON

  • Lovington High

RIO RANCHO

  • Cleveland High
  • Rio Rancho High
  • Shining Stars Preschool

ROSWELL

  • Goddard High
  • Parkview Early Literacy Center
  • Roswell High

SANTA FE

  • Pojoaque High

SOCORRO

  • Socorro High

During that same period, no schools were placed on the Closure List.

The Watchlist, maintained by the New Mexico Environment Department, includes schools and businesses with two or more Rapid Responses within 14 days. Those with four or more Rapid Responses in 14 days are placed on the Closure List and required to close and, where appropriate, return instruction to remote-only learning.

A Rapid Response is a series of interventions designed to prevent COVID-19 spread, beginning when the New Mexico Department of Health notifies a school that an employee or student has a confirmed positive case and was on campus/in the facility during the infectious period. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

If a school has four rapid responses in a 14-day period, it must close and remain in remote-only learning mode for 14 days.

Only the individual school that reached the four-in-14 threshold would be required to return to remote learning. That means a school district could have one school closed for in-person learning, another on the Watchlist, and others with no impact.


Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

Feb. 5, 2021

CORRECTION: The following news release was updated Feb. 9 to CORRECT in the next-to-last paragraph the reopening requirements following a closure.

PED: 32 New Mexico public schools on COVID-19 Watchlist

SANTA FE – Thirty-two New Mexico public school buildings appeared on the COVID-19 Watchlist in the week ending Friday, Feb. 5, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period.

Those school buildings are:

ALBUQUERQUE

  • Albuquerque High
  • Cleveland Middle
  • Eldorado High
  • Hope Christian Elementary
  • Susie Rayos Marmon Elementary
  • Volcano Vista High

ANTHONY

  • Gadsden High

ARTESIA

  • Artesia Public Schools Warehouse
  • Grand Heights Early Childhood

BELEN

  • Central Elementary

BLOOMFIELD

  • Bloomfield Early Childhood Center
  • Central Primary

DORA

  • Dora Elementary

ESPANOLA

  • Eutimio Salazar Elementary

FARMINGTON

  • Farmington Municipal Schools — Plant Op
  • McCormick Elementary
  • Northeast Elementary

GALLUP

  • Gallup McKinley County Schools-SSC

HOBBS

  • Hobbs High
  • Houston Middle

HONDO

  • Hondo Elementary

JEMEZ PUEBLO

  • Jemez Valley High

LAS CRUCES

  • Las Cruces Public Schools

LOVINGTON

  • Lovington High

RIO RANCHO

  • Shining Stars Preschool

ROSWELL

  • Gateway Christian Schools
  • Goddard High
  • Roswell AESC

RUIDOSO

  • Region IX Head Start

SANDIA PARK

  • East Mountain High

SANTA FE

  • Pojoaque High

SOCORRO

  • Socorro High

During that same period, no schools were placed on the Closure List.

The Watchlist, maintained by the New Mexico Environment Department, includes schools and businesses with two or more Rapid Responses within 14 days. Those with four or more Rapid Responses in 14 days are placed on the Closure List and required to close and, where appropriate, return instruction to remote-only learning.

A Rapid Response is a series of interventions designed to prevent COVID-19 spread, beginning when the New Mexico Department of Health notifies a school that an employee or student has a confirmed positive case and was on campus/in the facility during the infectious period. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

If a school has four rapid responses in a 14-day period, it must close and remain in remote-only learning mode for 14 days.

Only the individual school that reached the four-in-14 threshold would be required to return to remote learning. That means a school district could have one school closed for in-person learning, another on the Watchlist, and others with no impact.


Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

Jan. 29, 2021

PED: 31 New Mexico public schools on COVID-19 Watchlist

SANTA FE – Thirty-one New Mexico public school buildings appeared on the COVID-19 Watchlist in the week ending Friday, Jan. 29, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period.

Those school buildings are:

ALBUQUERQUE

  • Albuquerque High
  • Atrisco Heritage Academy HS
  • Del Norte High
  • Hope Christian Elementary
  • Menaul School
  • Petroglyph Elementary

ANTHONY

  • Gadsden High

ARTESIA

  • Artesia Public Schools Warehouse
  • Grand Heights Early Childhood

BELEN

  • Belen High

BLOOMFIELD

  • Bloomfield Early Childhood Center

DORA

  • Dora Elementary

ESPANOLA

  • Eutimio Salazar Elementary

FARMINGTON

  • Farmington Municipal Schools — Plant Op
  • Northeast Elementary
  • Piedra Vista High

GALLUP

  • Gallup McKinley County Schools-Maintenance and Operations

HOBBS

  • Houston Middle

HONDO

  • Hondo Elementary

JEMEZ PUEBLO

  • Jemez Valley Elementary
  • Jemez Valley High
  • Jemez Valley Middle

LAS CRUCES

  • Las Cruces Catholic School

RIO RANCHO

  • Enchanted Hills Elementary

ROSWELL

  • Gateway Christian School
  • Roswell Independent School District -AESC

RUIDOSO

  • Region IX Head Start
  • Sierra Vista Primary

SHIPROCK

  • Eva B. Stokely Elementary

SOCORRO

  • Socorro High

TEXICO

  • Texico High

During that same period, no schools were placed on the Closure List.

The Watchlist, maintained by the New Mexico Environment Department, includes schools and businesses with two or more Rapid Responses within 14 days. Those with four or more Rapid Responses in 14 days are placed on the Closure List and required to close and, where appropriate, return instruction to remote-only learning.

A Rapid Response is a series of interventions designed to prevent COVID-19 spread, beginning when the New Mexico Department of Health notifies a school that an employee or student has a confirmed positive case and was on campus/in the facility during the infectious period. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

If a public school is required to close because it has four or more Rapid Responses in a 14-day period, it must remain in remote-only learning mode until its county is in the green zone — a Department of Health distinction signifying acceptable control of the virus. See the map here.

Only the individual school that reached the four-in-14 threshold would be required to return to remote learning. That means a school district could have one school closed for in-person learning, another on the Watchlist, and others with no impact.


Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

Jan. 22, 2021

PED: 21 New Mexico public schools on COVID-19 Watchlist

SANTA FE – Twenty-one New Mexico public school buildings appeared on the COVID-19 Watchlist in the week ending Friday, Jan. 22, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period.

Those schools are:

ALBUQUERQUE

  • Hope Christian Elementary
  • Menaul School

BAYARD

  • Cobre High

BLOOMFIELD

  • Bloomfield High

CARLSBAD

  • Hillcrest Preschool

CLOVIS

  • Mesa Elementary

DEMING

  • Deming Public Schools-Administration Office

FARMINGTON

  • Farmington Municipal Schools — Plant Op

HOBBS

  • College Lane Elementary
  • Houston Middle

JEMEZ PUEBLO

  • Jemez Valley Elementary
  • Jemez Valley High
  • Jemez Valley Middle

LAS CRUCES

  • Las Cruces Public Schools

LOS ALAMOS

  • Los Alamos High

MONTEZUMA

  • United World College-USA

PORTALES

  • Brown Early Childhood Center

ROSWELL

  • Goddard High School
  • Roswell Independent School District -AESE

SHIPROCK

  • Eva B. Stokely Elementary

TEXICO

  • Texico High

During that same period, no schools were placed on the Closure List.

The Watchlist, maintained by the New Mexico Environment Department, includes schools and businesses with two or more Rapid Responses within 14 days. Those with four or more Rapid Responses in 14 days are placed on the Closure List and required to close and, where appropriate, return instruction to remote-only learning.

A Rapid Response is a series of interventions designed to prevent COVID-19 spread, beginning when the New Mexico Department of Health notifies a school that an employee or student has a confirmed positive case and was on campus/in the facility during the infectious period. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

If a public school is required to close because it has four or more Rapid Responses in a 14-day period, it must remain in remote-only learning mode until its county is in the green zone — a Department of Health distinction signifying acceptable control of the virus. See the map here.

Only the individual school that reached the four-in-14 threshold would be required to return to remote learning. That means a school district could have one school closed for in-person learning, another on the Watchlist, and others with no impact.


Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

Jan. 15, 2021

PED: 10 New Mexico public schools on COVID-19 Watchlist

SANTA FE – Ten New Mexico public school buildings appeared on the COVID-19 Watchlist in the week ending Friday, Jan. 15, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period.

Those schools are:

ALBUQUERQUE

  • James Monroe Middle

AZTEC

  • Aztec Maintenance

BAYARD

  • Cobre High

FRUITLAND

  • Ojo Amarillo Elementary

HOBBS

  • College Lane Elementary

LAS CRUCES

  • Las Cruces Public Schools physical plant

LOS ALAMOS

  • Los Alamos High

MONTEZUMA

  • United World College-USA

ROSWELL

  • Goddard High School
  • Roswell High School

During that same period, no schools were placed on the Closure List.

The Watchlist, maintained by the New Mexico Environment Department, includes schools and businesses with two or more Rapid Responses within 14 days. Those with four or more Rapid Responses in 14 days are placed on the Closure List and required to close and, where appropriate, return instruction to remote-only learning.

A Rapid Response is a series of interventions designed to prevent COVID-19 spread, beginning when the New Mexico Department of Health notifies a school that an employee or student has a confirmed positive case and was on campus/in the facility during the infectious period. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

If a public school is required to close because it has four or more Rapid Responses in a 14-day period, it must remain in remote-only learning mode until its county is in the green zone — a Department of Health distinction signifying acceptable control of the virus. See the map here.

Only the individual school that reached the four-in-14 threshold would be required to return to remote learning. That means a school district could have one school closed for in-person learning, another on the Watchlist, and others with no impact.


Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

Jan. 8, 2021

PED: 5 New Mexico public schools on COVID-19 Watchlist

SANTA FE – Five New Mexico public school buildings appeared on the COVID-19 Watchlist in the week ending Friday, Jan. 8, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period.

Those schools are:

AZTEC

  • Aztec Maintenance

KIRTLAND

  • Judy Nelson Elementary

LOS ALAMOS

  • Los Alamos High

ROSWELL

  • Goddard High School

WAGON MOUND

  • Wagon Mound High

During that same period, no schools were placed on the Closure List.

The Watchlist, maintained by the New Mexico Environment Department, includes schools and businesses with two or more Rapid Responses within 14 days. Those with four or more Rapid Responses in 14 days are placed on the Closure List and required to close and, where appropriate, return instruction to remote-only learning.

A Rapid Response is a series of interventions designed to prevent COVID-19 spread, beginning when the New Mexico Department of Health notifies a school that an employee or student has a confirmed positive case and was on campus/in the facility during the infectious period. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

If a public school is required to close because it has four or more Rapid Responses in a 14-day period, it must remain in remote-only learning mode until its county is in the green zone — a Department of Health distinction signifying acceptable control of the virus. See the map here.

Only the individual school that reached the four-in-14 threshold would be required to return to remote learning. That means a school district could have one school closed for in-person learning, another on the Watchlist, and others with no impact.


Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

Dec. 31, 2020

PED: 10 New Mexico public schools on COVID-19 Watchlist

SANTA FE – Ten New Mexico public school buildings appeared on the COVID-19 Watchlist in the holiday-shortened week ending Thursday, Dec. 31, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period.

Those schools are:

BELEN

  • Gil Sanchez Elementary

FRUITLAND

  • Ojo Amarillo Elementary

KIRTLAND

  • Judy Nelson Elementary

RIO RANCHO

  • Cleveland High

ROSWELL

  • Berrendo Elementary
  • Goddard High School
  • Military Heights Elementary

SHIPROCK

  • Eva B. Stokely Elementary
  • Shiprock Transportation

WAGON MOUND

  • Wagon Mound High

During that same period, no schools were placed on the Closure List.

The Watchlist, maintained by the New Mexico Environment Department, includes schools and businesses with two or more Rapid Responses within 14 days. Those with four or more Rapid Responses in 14 days are placed on the Closure List and required to close and, where appropriate, return instruction to remote-only learning.

A Rapid Response is a series of interventions designed to prevent COVID-19 spread, beginning when the New Mexico Department of Health notifies a school that an employee or student has a confirmed positive case and was on campus/in the facility during the infectious period. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

If a public school is required to close because it has four or more Rapid Responses in a 14-day period, it must remain in remote-only learning mode until its county is in the green zone — a Department of Health distinction signifying acceptable control of the virus. See the map here.

Only the individual school that reached the four-in-14 threshold would be required to return to remote learning. That means a school district could have one school closed for in-person learning, another on the Watchlist, and others with no impact.


Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

Dec. 18, 2020

PED: 45 New Mexico public schools on COVID-19 Watchlist

SANTA FE – Forty-five New Mexico public school buildings appeared on the COVID-19 Watchlist in the week ending Friday, Dec. 18, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period.

Those schools are:

ALBUQUERQUE

  • Cibola High
  • Cleveland Middle
  • Helen Cordero Primary
  • James Monroe
  • La Cueva High
  • Reginald Chavez Elementary

ANTHONY

  • Gadsden High

ARTESIA

  • Artesia High
  • Grand Heights Early Childhood
  • Roselawn Elementary

BELEN

  • BCS-Student Nutrition
  • Gil Sanchez Elementary
  • Rio Grande Elementary

CARLSBAD

  • Carlsbad Intermediate

CLAYTON

  • Alvis Elementary
  • Clayton High

CLOVIS

  • Clovis High
  • Clovis High School Freshman Academy

ESPANOLA

  • Española Valley High

EUNICE

  • Mettie Jordan Elementary

FARMINGTON

  • McCormick Elementary
  • Piedra Vista High

FRUITLAND

  • Ojo Amarillo Elementary

GALLUP

  • Del Norte Elementary
  • Gallup Central Alternative
  • Hozho Academy
  • Indian Hills Elementary
  • Tobe Turpen Elementary

HATCH

  • Hatch Valley High

HOBBS

  • Sanger Elementary

KIRTLAND

  • Central High

LAS CRUCES

  • Las Cruces Public Schools administrative office

LAS VEGAS

  • Las Vegas City School

LOVINGTON

  • Ben Alexander Elementary

NEWCOMB

  • Newcomb High

OJO CALIENTE

  • Mesa Vista High

PORTALES

  • Portales High

ROSWELL

  • Missouri Ave Elementary
  • Roswell High

RUIDOSO

  • Ruidoso Middle

SANTA FE

  • New Mexico Connections Academy
  • Santa Fe High

SHIPROCK

  • Eva B. Stokely Elementary
  • Nizhoni Elementary
  • Shiprock High

During that same period, no schools were placed on the Closure List.

The Watchlist, maintained by the New Mexico Environment Department, includes schools and businesses with two or more Rapid Responses within 14 days. Those with four or more Rapid Responses in 14 days are placed on the Closure List and required to close and, where appropriate, return instruction to remote-only learning.

A Rapid Response is a series of interventions designed to prevent COVID-19 spread, beginning when the New Mexico Department of Health notifies a school that an employee or student has a confirmed positive case and was on campus/in the facility during the infectious period. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

If a public school is required to close because it has four or more Rapid Responses in a 14-day period, it must remain in remote-only learning mode until its county is in the green zone — a Department of Health distinction signifying acceptable control of the virus. See the map here.

Only the individual school that reached the four-in-14 threshold would be required to return to remote learning. That means a school district could have one school closed for in-person learning, another on the Watchlist, and others with no impact.


Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

Dec. 11, 2020

PED: 42 New Mexico public schools on COVID-19 Watchlist

SANTA FE – Forty-two New Mexico public school buildings appeared on the COVID-19 Watchlist in the week ending Friday, Dec. 11, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period.

Those schools are:

ALBUQUERQUE

  • Cibola High
  • Cleveland Middle
  • James Monroe Middle
  • Helen Cordero Primary
  • La Cueva High
  • Media Arts Collaborative Charter
  • Washington Middle
  • Zia Elementary

ANTHONY

  • Gadsden High

ARTESIA

  • Artesia Park Junior High

BELEN

  • Rio Grande Elementary

CARLSBAD

  • Carlsbad Intermediate
  • Monterrey Elementary

CLAYTON

  • Alvis Elementary

CLOVIS

  • Clovis High School Freshman Academy
  • Zia Elementary

DEMING

  • Red Mountain Middle

EUNICE

  • Mettie Jordan Elementary

FARMINGTON

  • Country Club Elementary
  • McCormick Elementary

GALLUP

  • Del Norte Elementary
  • Hozho Academy

HOBBS

  • Sanger Elementary

JEMEZ PUEBLO

  • Jemez Valley High

KIRTLAND

  • Kirtland Central High School

LAS CRUCES

  • Las Cruces Public Schools administrative office

LOVINGTON

  • Ben Alexander Elementary

MOUNTAINAIR

  • Mountainair High

NEWCOMB

  • Newcomb High

OHKAY OWINGEH

  • La Tierra Montessori School

PORTALES

  • Portales High

ROSWELL

  • Mesa Middle
  • Missouri Ave Elementary
  • Parkview Early Literacy Center
  • Roswell High
  • Washington Avenue Elementary

SANTA FE

  • New Mexico Connections Academy
  • Santa Fe High
  • Santa Fe Public Schools Transportation Department

SHIPROCK

  • Central Consolidated School
  • Nizhoni Elementary
  • Shiprock High

During that same period, no schools were placed on the Closure List.

The Watchlist, maintained by the New Mexico Environment Department, includes schools and businesses with two or more Rapid Responses within 14 days. Those with four or more Rapid Responses in 14 days are placed on the Closure List and required to close and, where appropriate, return instruction to remote-only learning.

A Rapid Response is a series of interventions designed to prevent COVID-19 spread, beginning when the New Mexico Department of Health notifies a school that an employee or student has a confirmed positive case and was on campus/in the facility during the infectious period. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

If a public school is required to close because it has four or more Rapid Responses in a 14-day period, it must remain in remote-only learning mode until its county is in the green zone — a Department of Health distinction signifying acceptable control of the virus. See the map here.

Only the individual school that reached the four-in-14 threshold would be required to return to remote learning. That means a school district could have one school closed for in-person learning, another on the Watchlist, and others with no impact.


Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

Dec. 4, 2020

PED: 59 New Mexico public schools on COVID-19 Watchlist

SANTA FE – Fifty-nine New Mexico public school buildings appeared on the COVID-19 Watchlist in the week ending Friday, Dec. 4, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period.

Those schools are:

ALBUQUERQUE

  • Chaparral Elementary
  • Christine Duncan Heritage
  • Cibola High
  • Jimmy Carter Middle
  • La Cueva High
  • Madison Middle
  • Mission Avenue Elementary
  • Robert F. Kennedy Charter
  • Sandia High
  • Tierra Adentro
  • Zia Elementary

ANTHONY

  • Gadsden Middle School
  • Gadsden Independent School District Physical Plant

CARLSBAD

  • Monterrey Elementary

CHAPARRAL

  • Chaparrel High

CLOVIS

  • La Casita Elementary
  • Zia Elementary

CUBA

  • Cuba Elementary

ESPAÑOLA

  • Eutimio Salazar Elementary
  • Española Public School District administrative office

FARMINGTON

  • Country Club Elementary
  • Northeast Elementary

GALLUP

  • Del Norte Elementary

GRANTS

  • Grants Central Office

HOBBS

  • Hobbs Schools administrative offices
  • Will Rogers Elementary

JEMEZ PUEBLO

  • Jemez Valley High

KIRTLAND

  • Kirtland Central High School
  • Kirtland Elementary

LAS CRUCES

  • Las Cruces Public Schools administrative office

LOVINGTON

  • Taylor Middle

MILAN

  • Milan Elementary

MOUNTAINAIR

  • Mountainair Elementary

NEWCOMB

  • Newcomb Elementary
  • Newcomb High

PORTALES

  • Portales High

RIO RANCHO

  • Rio Rancho Elementary
  • Vista Grande Elementary

ROSWELL

  • Berrendo Middle
  • Monterrey Elementary
  • Nancy Lopez Elementary
  • Parkview Early Literacy Center
  • Roswell High
  • Sierra Middle
  • Valley View Elementary
  • Washington Avenue Elementary

SANTA FE

  • Academy for Technology
  • Chaparral Elementary
  • Nina Otera Community School
  • Santa Fe High
  • Santa Fe Public Schools transportation department

SHIPROCK

  • Career Prep Alternative
  • Central Consolidated School
  • Eva B. Stokely Elementary
  • Nizhoni Elementary

TATUM

  • Tatum Elementary

TOHATCHI

  • Tohatchi Elementary

ZUNI

  • Shiwi Ts’Ana Elementary
  • Zuni Bus Barn

During that same period, no schools were placed on the Closure List.

The Watchlist, maintained by the New Mexico Environment Department, includes schools and businesses with two or more Rapid Responses within 14 days. Those with four or more Rapid Responses in 14 days are placed on the Closure List and required to close and, where appropriate, return instruction to remote-only learning.

A Rapid Response is a series of interventions designed to prevent COVID-19 spread, beginning when the New Mexico Department of Health notifies a school that an employee or student has a confirmed positive case and was on campus/in the facility during the infectious period. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

If a public school is required to close because it has four or more Rapid Responses in a 14-day period, it must remain in remote-only learning mode until its county is in the green zone — a Department of Health distinction signifying acceptable control of the virus. See the map here.

Only the individual school that reached the four-in-14 threshold would be required to return to remote learning. That means a school district could have one school closed for in-person learning, another on the Watchlist, and others with no impact.


Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

Nov. 27, 2020

PED: 59 New Mexico public schools on COVID-19 Watchlist

SANTA FE – Fifty-nine New Mexico public school buildings appeared on the COVID-19 Watchlist in the week ending Friday, Nov. 27, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period.

Those schools are:

ALBUQUERQUE

  • Bel-Air Elementary
  • Chaparral Elementary
  • Cibola High
  • La Cueva High
  • Mission Avenue Elementary
  • Rio Grande High
  • Robert F. Kennedy Charter
  • Zia Elementary
  • Sunset Mesa School

ANTHONY

  • Gadsden Middle School
  • Gadsden Independent School District Physical Plant

BELEN

  • Belen Consolidated Schools Administrative Office
  • Belen Middle School

CARLSBAD

  • Carlsbad High
  • Monterrey Elementary

CLOVIS

  • Cameo Elementary
  • La Casita Elementary
  • Parkview Elementary

DEMING

  • Deming Intermediate
  • Red Mountain Middle School

ESPAÑOLA

  • Española Valley High
  • Eutimio Salazar Elementary
  • Española Public School District administrative office

FARMINGTON

  • Northeast Elementary

FRUITLAND

  • Ojo Amarillo Elementary

GALLUP

  • Del Norte Elementary
  • Jefferson Elementary
  • Twin Lakes Elementary

HOBBS

  • Edison Elementary
  • Hobbs High
  • Hobbs Schools administrative offices

KIRTLAND

  • Kirtland Central High School
  • Kirtland Elementary
  • Kirtland Middle

LAS CRUCES

  • Las Cruces Public Schools administrative office

LOVINGTON

  • Jefferson Middle
  • Taylor Middle

MILAN

  • Milan Elementary

MOUNTAINAIR

  • Mountainair Elementary

NEWCOMB

  • Newcomb High

PORTALES

  • Brown Early Childhood Center
  • Portales High

RIO RANCHO

  • Vista Grande Elementary

ROSWELL

  • Berrendo Elementary
  • Berrendo Middle
  • Monterrey Elementary
  • Nancy Lopez Elementary
  • Roswell High
  • Sierra Middle
  • Washington Avenue Elementary

SANTA FE

  • Chaparral Elementary
  • Nina Otera Community School
  • Pojoaque Intermediate

SHIPROCK

  • Career Prep Alternative
  • Central Consolidated School
  • Eva B. Stokely Elementary

TATUM

  • Tatum Elementary

ZUNI

  • Shiwi Ts’Ana Elementary
  • Zuni Bus Barn

During that same period, no schools were placed on the Closure List.

The Watchlist, maintained by the New Mexico Environment Department, includes schools and businesses with two or more Rapid Responses within 14 days. Those with four or more Rapid Responses in 14 days are placed on the Closure List and required to close and, where appropriate, return instruction to remote-only learning.

A Rapid Response is a series of interventions designed to prevent COVID-19 spread, beginning when the New Mexico Department of Health notifies a school that an employee or student has a confirmed positive case and was on campus/in the facility during the infectious period. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

If a public school is required to close because it has four or more Rapid Responses in a 14-day period, it must remain in remote-only learning mode until its county is in the green zone — a Department of Health distinction signifying acceptable control of the virus. See the map here.

Only the individual school that reached the four-in-14 threshold would be required to return to remote learning. That means a school district could have one school closed for in-person learning, another on the Watchlist, and others with no impact.


Contact: Judy Robinson
judy.robinson@state.nm.us
505-231-6889

Nov. 24, 2020

PLEASE NOTE: The following information was intended for release on Friday, Nov. 20, but was delayed due to technical issues. The next report is scheduled for release Friday, Nov. 27

PED: 19 New Mexico public schools on COVID-19 Watchlist

SANTA FE – Nineteen New Mexico public school buildings were placed on the COVID-19 Watchlist in the week ending Friday, Nov. 20, signifying they had at least two Rapid Responses within a 14-day period.

Those schools are:

ALBUQUERQUE

  • Bel-Air Elementary
  • La Cueva High
  • Sunset Mesa School

ANTHONY

  • Gadsden Independent Schools Physical Plant

BELEN

  • Belen Middle

CLOVIS

  • La Casita Elementary in Clovis

DEMING

  • Deming Intermediate

ESPAÑOLA

  • Española Valley High
  • Eutimio Salazar Elementary
  • Española Public School District administrative office

HOBBS

  • Hobbs High
  • Hobbs Schools administrative offices

KIRTLAND

  • Kirtland Middle

LAS CRUCES

  • Las Cruces Public Schools administrative office

LOVINGTON

  • Taylor Middle

PORTALES

  • Brown Early Childhood Center

ROSWELL

  • Berrendo Middle
  • Sierra Middle

SANTA FE

  • Pojoaque Intermediate

During that same period, no schools were placed on the Closure List.

The Watchlist, maintained by the New Mexico Environment Department, includes schools and businesses with two or more Rapid Responses within 14 days. Those with four or more Rapid Responses in 14 days are placed on the Closure List and required to close and, where appropriate, return instruction to remote-only learning.

A Rapid Response is a series of interventions designed to prevent COVID-19 spread, beginning when the New Mexico Department of Health notifies a school that an employee or student has a confirmed positive case and was on campus/in the facility during the infectious period. Read the complete COVID-19 Rapid Response Watchlist here.

If a public school is required to close because it has four or more Rapid Responses in a 14-day period, it must remain in remote-only learning mode until its county is in the green zone — a Department of Health distinction signifying acceptable control of the virus. See the map here.

Only the individual school that reached the four-in-14 threshold would be required to return to remote learning. That means a school district could have one school closed for in-person learning, another on the Watchlist, and others with no impact.




Page last updated April 24, 2021